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  1. #1
    shureef's Avatar
    shureef is offline Registered User

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    Unhappy fishes to avoid for newbies

    Hi everyone,
    i would like to start a thread focusing on the few commonly available "harder to keep fishes". To learn from the pros and to warn off newbies like me NOT making the same mistakes again. Because it's not only waste money but also killing the wonderful creatures from the ocean.

    yours sincerely

    shureef

    Set up date: January 2012 Display Size: 200 Total Water In System: 230 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? YES Amount of Liverock: 200 Depth of Sandbed: 4 Salinity level: 1.025
    ALK level: don't know Ammonia: don't know Nitrate: don't know Nitrite: don't know
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: don't know
    nova T5 HOX4 bm nac7 NO
    Fish and Inverts: flame angel, 3xdamsel, bi-color blenny, 2xclown, yellow tang, bi-color dottyback, gold head goby, swallowtail angel(girl), banded shrimp, cleaner shrimp, snails, Corals: softies & Lps
    Other Equipment: RO/DI 4 STAGE

  2. #2
    mark0933's Avatar
    mark0933 is offline Seahorse Forum Moderator
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    Tangs don't belong in an aquarium
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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies

    Very difficult, but I'll start:

    Most Anthias (multi feedings per day)
    Most butterflies (unless fish only tank)
    Panther groupers (look so cute when sold at 3" in the LFS but grow big)
    Cleaner Wrasses - no point in buying them
    Blue ribbon eels
    Clown Tangs, powder blues
    Any tiny fish (like the 1" blue tangs) - they have such a high metabolism, require constant feeding
    Seahorses (cool water species tank really needed)
    Small cowfish - again cute in the LFS

    Corals/inverts:
    Any anemone - wait until the tank (and you) are established
    Sea Apple - deadly
    Octopus - short life and escape artists
    Horseshoe crab


    Mark

    Set up date: January 2000 Display Size: 720 Total Water In System: 750 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? NO Amount of Liverock: 250 Bulk reef ecorock, 200 Tampabay aquacultured, and 100 misc other Depth of Sandbed: 3 Salinity level: 1.024
    ALK level: ? Ammonia: 0 Nitrate: 0 Nitrite: 0
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: 400
    PFO 400W 20K XM Halide on lumenbrights Reeflo Orca 250 Schuran
    Fish and Inverts: Regal tang, fairy wrasses, a pair of spotted mandarin, Arabian dottyback, pair of Percs, Maldives clown, Yellow tang, couple of chromis, pair of crosshatch triggers Corals: SPS, duncan, acan, elegance, heliopora, orange plate, favia, ricordea, and assorted others
    Other Equipment: Gold Dart return pump to OM 4 way above the tank, 3 Tunze waveboxes in sync, 4 other Tunze 6100's for random flow



    2 x 110 Gallon 48 x 20 x 30 high Tanks side by side 4 x 400 MH lighting 20K XM bulbs supplimented by 10K PC's, Poseidon T4 return pump to 2 1/2 sea swirls and 2 maxijets on a wave maker, ocean motion squirt in second tank SPS, Heliopora (blue coral), blastomussa, various zoos and a few ricordea, 2 Coloured Crocea/maxima 2 Breeding pair of bangii cardinals, regal tang, flame angel, orchid dottyback, spotted manderin Peppermint shrimp, cleaner shrimp, various snails, fighting conch, 2 55 Gallon Sumps in sequence - 1 with refugium and DSB in it, baby bangii, planted tank RO/DI, Koralin Calc reactor, Euroreef 6-2 skimmer

  3. #3
    thejoe is offline Registered User

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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies

    Copperband butterfly
    mandarins golbies/dragonettes
    sea cucumbers
    bannerfish
    loinfish(not hard to keep but dangerous)
    stonefish
    hippo tangs(prone to ick)

    Set up date: August 2009 Display Size: 150 Total Water In System: 175 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? NO Amount of Liverock: 170lbs Depth of Sandbed: 2" argonite 3" sugar Salinity level: 1.028
    ALK level: not tested Ammonia: 0 Nitrate: 0 Nitrite: 0
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: not tested
    2 40w T8, 160w self ballasted MH and 1 400w 14k mh CPR bakpak and marineland 300 no
    Fish and Inverts: assorted snails 4 chromis regular clown dragon wrasse blue throat trigger regal anglefish Corals: open brain acan
    Other Equipment: 2x power heads and a korilia magnum 5

  4. #4
    Ken_Baird's Avatar
    Ken_Baird is offline WGMS

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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies

    Kidding a side, I think the easier question would be what fish should Newbies start with, this list would be shorter. As tempting as it is, the right direction maybe starting with the easy to care for fish and if you can keep them a live for a few month's then move on to the next step. "patience grasshopper"

    This I would hate to get bashed for suggesting as I was always told to start off with Yellowtail Damsel's, but personally I think this is a very aggressive fish and wouldn't put one in my tank.

    http://www.aquaticcommunity.com/Dams...tailDamsel.php

    Maybe there's some other fish that could be recommended? Maybe a list of the easiest fish from each family.

    HTH 's

    Set up date: October 2009 Display Size: 120 Total Water In System: 155 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? YES Amount of Liverock: 140lbs fiji Depth of Sandbed: 1 Salinity level: 1.025
    ALK level: 9 Ammonia: 0 Nitrate: 0 Nitrite: 0
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: 420
    T5 8x54W Euro-Reef RS135 NO
    Fish and Inverts: Mated pair False Percula Clown, Sailfin Tang, mandarin goby, Cleaner Wrasse, Pair Banggai Cardinals, Astraea, Turbo, Nassarius, Cerith -snails, pair cleaner shrimp Corals: Soft , LPS
    Other Equipment: CA4000 (1300GPH return) ,drilled 1.5" return center overflow, Closed Loop - Reeflo Snapper running on Ocean Motion Super Squirt, Reactor (GFO and carbon) feed by drain, 500W heater, DIY sump, Purely H2O Optima C/A 75G RO/DI Other Information: 30G mix tank, air stone & pump, powerhead for mixing, 50W heater only to heat before water change
    "Failure is not an option"
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  5. #5
    Sweet Ride's Avatar
    Sweet Ride is offline more SPS!!!!!

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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies

    This is not my own list but just a guideline that I use. This should get everyone started. Sorry about the really long post.

    Good Beginner Fish

    Angelfish

    Coral Beauty Angelfish [Centropyge bispinosus] (probably the hardiest of all the dwarf angels but they can nibble on corals and clams)

    Half Black Angelfish [Centropyge vroliki] (see Coral Beauty)

    Pygmy/Cherub Angelfish [Centropyge argi] (see Coral Beauty but
    consider that they are often meaner, the same goes for most other similar shaped Pygmy Angels)

    *Angels can be a little prone to disease but are otherwise pretty hardy if given a good diet

    Blennies

    Bicolor Blenny [Ecsenius bicolor] (great little fish with lots of personality that can help with algae problems, only problem is they're know to sometimes take a liking to munching on corals and clams, procede with caution)

    Tail Spot Blenny [Ecsenius stigmatura] (in most cases probably a better choice all around than the Bicolor Blenny, though they aren't quite as boisterous which can be a good or bad thing depending on your perspective, less commonly available)

    Linear Blenny [Ecsenius lineatus] (see above)

    Cardinalfish

    Pajama/Spotted/Orange Lined Cadinalfish [Sphaeramia nematoptera most common] (peaceful, disease resistant, and hardy, Cardinalfish in general are good choices just be a little more leary of Bangaii Cardinals that are new to captivity and red nocturnal varieties)

    Clownfish/Chromis/Damselfish

    Tank Raised Clownfish [Amphiprion sp.] (percula and ocellaris stay smaller and are les aggressive, Skunk clowns can be more peaceful as well, Maroon clowns tend to be the meanest, and all the others usually fall somewhere in between)

    Green Chromis [Chromis viridis] (very peaceful and will school, but it is becoming pretty clear that in smaller schools they will sometimes pick the weakest member of the group off one by one, perhaps larger schools of 6+ in larger aquariums would eliminate that possibility)

    Yellowtail Damselfish [Chrysiptera parasema] (can be aggressive but not quite as mean as most other Damselfish, add them as one of your last fish)

    *In general Damsels are very hardy but the majority of them get far too mean to be considered good inhabitants in most tanks

    Gobies/Dartfish

    Firefish [Nemateleotris decora/magnifica] (great reef fish, just be weary when keeping in groups as they can turn on one another, singles or mated pairs are you best bet, they have been known to jump but it's not a big problem)

    Scissortail Goby/Dartfish [Ptereleotris evides] (almost identical to Firefish in care)

    Yellow Watchman Goby [Cryptocentrus cinctus] (tough as nails, very comical, peaceful, but a little shy and require some sand to burrow in, make sure your rocks are stacked securely)

    Pink Spotted Watchman [Cryptocentrus leptocephalus] (see Yellow Watchman)

    Gold/Blue Neon Goby (peaceful and often avilable as tank raised, keep as mated pairs or singles unless you have a large aquarium)

    Hector's Goby [Amblyeleotris hectori] (similar to Rainford's but seem to accept prepared foods more often, just make sure they're eating before purchase and keep them with more peaceful fish, they will also sift food from your sandbed and tidy it up so it's best to have a sandbed)

    Pseudochromis/Basslets

    Royal Gramma [Gramma loreto] (kept singly they are peaceful, but the biggest drawback is their shyness, provide plenty of overhangs, they may also do best in aquariums with a little less intense lighting)

    Pseudochromis [springeri/fridmani/flavivertex/aldabraensis] (very hardy and disease resistant, however can get quite mean, they are fairly well behaved as long as they're the last fish added and you avoid similar size/shape fish, frequently available as tank raised)

    Pseudochromis sankeyi (same as above except far more peaceful)

    Tangs/Foxfaces

    Zebrasoma sp. [Yellow, Purple, Scopas, Sailfin] (these are the hardiest of the tangs in my opinion, still not great beginner fish, but if you must have a Tang these are the best choices, be sure to provide plenty of green stuff for them to graze on and feed them often to stay plump, as a basic guideline it's best to keep these in 75 gal. or larger aquariums with the consideration that they might outgrow those down the road, they can get mean so make them later additions)

    Foxfaces/Rabbitfish [Siganus vulpinus is the most common] (these fish can get quite large so be sure to research if your tank is large enough to house one, they're great at algae control, more disease resistant than their cousins the Tang, and generally more peaceful, also keep in mind their dorsal spines are mildly venomous)

    Wrasses

    Six/Four Line Wrasse (can get mean much like the Pseudochromis, but also requires a sandbed to borrow in, sometimes these will consume undesirable flatworms)


    Fish To Be Avoided::
    Fish that have incredibly low survivability in aquaria or are totally unsuitable for home aquaria

    Moorish Idol (Zanclus cornutus): A few success stories, but miniscule amounts live long, difficult feeder, mystery deaths, and even when accepting prepared foods often slowly starve

    Rock Beauty Angelfish (Holacanthus tricolor): Nearly impossible to meet the dietary needs in home aquaria

    Multi-Barred Angelfish (Centropyge multifasciatus): They don't adapt to aquarium life well, rarely eat, and are very secretive, though not fatal, they also seem particularly prone to Lymphocystis

    Venustus Angelfish (Centropyge venustus): See the Multi-Barred Angelfish above

    Butterflyfishes (Chaetodon spp.): Many problem feeders in the group and most are corallivore that are almost guaranteed to starve to death in aquaria, do a lot of research before purchasing any butterflyfish

    Clown Tang (Acanthurus lineatus): VERY ich prone and a finicky eater, horrible survival rates, when they do live they are terribly aggressive and often take over a tank

    Twinspot Goby (Signogobius ocellatus): Terrible survival rates in captivity, rarely accept prepared foods or survive long even when they do

    Clown Sweetlips (Plectorhinchus chaetodonoides): Difficult feeders and rarely adapt to aquarium life, should you manage to get one to live they get quite large

    Oriental Sweetlips (Plectorhinchus orientalis): See Clown Sweetlips, in general this can be repeated for most species in the genus Diagramma and Plectorhinchus

    Pinnatus Batfish (Platax pinnatus): Gorgeous fish when young, very very few success stories, diet, disease, and stress from aquarium life are big issues

    Tiger Tiera Batfish (Platax batavianus): See Pinnatus Batfish above

    Orange Spotted Filefish (Oxymonacanthus longirostris): Specialized coral polyp feeder and almost never accepts prepared foods

    Ribbon Eel (Rhinomuraena quaesita): Rarely eat in captivity and are excellent escape artists

    Snake Eels & Garden Eels (various genera): Difficult feeders that require specialty tanks

    Cleaner Wrasses (Labroides spp.): Specialized parasite feeders that rarely live long in captivity, leave them in the ocean where they can do their job

    Tamarin Wrasses (Anampses spp.): Very poor shippers and need tanks with their special needs in mind, even then they often starve to death, their best chance is often a large established reef aquarium with large amounts of live rock, peaceful fish, and something to prevent their escape from jumping

    Leopard Wrasses (Macropharyngodon spp.): See Tamarin Wrasses above, but there are more success stories, both these and the Anampses are boderline being in this area of the list and the next section

    Pencil Wrasses (Pseodojuloides spp.): Very sensitive, they almost always die in transit so you don't see them very often if ever in the trade

    Parrotfishes (Family Scaridae): Very specialized feeders on mostly dead (some live) coral skeletons and the algae and organisms associated with them, they adapt poorly to aquarium life in almost all regards

    Tilefishes (Family Malacanthidae): VERY timid and must be kept in a covered aquarium with lots of space and docile tankmates, in general they just don't adapt to aquarium life

    Cartilaginous Fishes (Sharks, Rays, Skates): With very few exceptions, unless you own a massive aquarium that is several hundred gallons stay away

    Grunts (Family Haemulidae): Rarely adapt well to aquarium life and should probably only be considered in a large species tank

    Jacks (Family Carangidae): See Grunts above

    Drums (Family Sciaenidae): Poor shippers, being very shy and fragile they rarely live long after being collected

    Trumpetfish (Aulostomus spp.): Too large and too specialized for 99.9% of the aquarists out there, also poor shippers

    Remoras (Family Echeneidae): Unless you have a large Shark or Whale in your backyard oceanarium it's probably best to stay away

    Leopard Blenny (Exallias brevis): Specialized coral feeders that rarely live long in captivity

    Chambered Nautilus (Nautilus pompilius): Though technically not a fish, there are a plethora of reasons to leave them in the ocean, simply not suited for typical aquarium life

    Fish Best Left For Experienced Or Knowledgable Hobbyists:
    Finicky nature, parasite prone, specialty feeders, require specialty tanks, or threatened species

    Anthias (family Anthiinae): Require a good amount of swimming room, peaceful tankmates, and frequent feedings, often unhealthy and starving by the time they make it to dealers tanks, some almost require special tanks with their needs in mind and others often refuse to eat and starve quickly in aquaria, do plenty of research before purchasing any Anthias

    Teira Batfish (Platax teira): Can be very hardy once acclimated but there can be problems feeding, they stress easily, are disease prone, and will also outgrow most aquaria

    Majestic, Blueface(Pomacanthus Euxiphipops spp.): Can be hardy once acclimated to aquarium life and eating well, that's often easier said than done though, larger juvenilles are often the best way to go with these fish as tiny specimens are quite fragile and large specimens have the hardest time adapting to aquarium life, this is true for many large angelfish

    Regal Angelfish (Pygoplites diacanthus): A problem feeder, specimens from the Philippines and Indonesia rarely make it long in captivity, Red Sea Specimens tend to be hardier and more willing to accept prepared foods partially due to collection and holding techniques, the more recent trend to keep this fish in reef aquariums helps with survivability

    Bandit Angelfish (Holacanthus arcuatus aka Apolemichthys arcuatus): Very similar to the Rock Beauty above but with a much smaller sample, at their price you'll probably do your research, if you don't you'll most likely learn an expensive lesson

    Bicolor Angelfish (Centropyge bicolor): Concerns with drugs used in collection and frequent unwillingness to accept prepared foods, also one of the more common coral nippers

    Heralds's or Yellow Angelfish (Centropyge heraldi): Often collected with the use of drugs, be very wary of newly collected specimens, this can be true with many Centropyge but seems especially problematic here

    Lemonpeel Angelfish (Centropyge flavissima): See Herald's angelfish above

    Potter's Angelfish (Centropyge potteri): Mixed results with this one with a lot of mystery deaths early in captivity, if they've been eating and active at the fish store for a few weeks they usually end up being quite hardy

    Golden Pygmy Angelfish (Centropyge aurantius): Adapts poorly to aquarium life, only attempt if you find a healthy specimen and have a larger reef aquarium containing less boisterous fish with a lot of rock to graze on

    Swallowtail Angelfishes (Genicanthus spp.): Can be hardy once acclimated, but lots of problem specimens due to the depths they are collected at, take extra special care in examining and observing them before purchase

    Angelfish in General (Centropyge, Chaetodontoplus, Apolemichthys, etc. spp.): Just a general note, Angelfish are among the more common fish collected using cyanide, so paying particularly close attention to their behavior and appearance before purchase is advised

    Butterflyfishes (Chaetodon spp.): Very few are suited for a reef tank or a beginner hobbyist, do your research

    Copperband Butterflyfish (Chelmon rostratus): Like the Regal Angelfish, this one has gone from nearly impossible to having some success with the popularity of them being kept in reef tanks, even then, longevity is questionable

    Garibaldi Damselfish (Hypsypops rubicunda): Typically will not do well longterm in tropical conditions, if they do live long that cute little fish turns into a large territotial nightmare

    Trunkfish, Boxfish, and Cowfish (various genera): Most are rather sensitive and can release toxins when stressed or dying

    Clown/Gumdrop Gobies (Gobiodon spp.): Poor shipper, once established can be a good surviver with less boisterous fish, will nip "SPS" corals

    Catalina gobies (Lythrypnus dalli): Not a tropical species and will not live long in the temperature of the average marine aquarium

    Mandarin "Gobies" and Scooter "Blennies" aka Dragonets (family Callionymidae): Require large amounts of live food, quite often starve to death, providing larger tanks (50+ gallons) with large amounts of live rock and little competition for food has proved successful, do not treat with copper medications

    Radiata Lionfish (Pterois radiata): Tough to acclimate to aquarium life and foods, more sensitive than others in the genus

    Fu manchu Lionfish & Dwarf Zebra Lionfish (Dendrochirus spp.): All the dwarf Lions require tanks with their needs in mind, these two also seem very sensitive, very shy, are poor shippers, and can be particularly difficult to ween onto aquarium foods

    Anglerfishes and Frogfishes (Order Lophiiformes/Antennariiformes): Most get very large and can consume fish nearly their own size, often will only consume live foods which is troublesome since feeder fish are rarely nutritious enough longtern

    Achilles, Powder Brown, Powder Blue, and Gold Rim Tangs (Acanthurus spp.): Ich prone and fairly sensitive to water conditions, they also require large amounts of swimming room, very risky to consider one without quarantine

    Bristletooth Tangs (Ctenochaetus spp.): Ich prone, some of the hardier tangs once established but can starve when detritus and algae aren't available in decent supply, so overly "clean" aquariums are not a good choice, the Chevron is probably the least hardy of the genus and can be particularly difficult

    Seahorses, Seadragons, Pipefish (Family Syngnathidae): Need quiet species tanks and large quantities of nutritious live food, wild caught specimens ship poorly and have high mortality rates, tank raised seahorses are often already accepting prepared foods and are much better candidates for aquarium life, they still need a tank with their needs in mind though

    Hawkfishes ( Family Cirrhitidae): Hardy fish but they are notorious jumpers, be very careful with ornamental shrimp, crabs, and small fish

    Porcupine Pufferfish (Family Diodontidae): Can be hardy but some are very disease and parasite prone, most require large fish only aquariums

    Fairy and Flasher Wrasses (Paracheilinus and Cirrilabrus spp.): Require peaceful tankmates and do best in reef aquariums, they stress easily and the first few weeks in captivity will often make or break their longevity, known jumpers

    Lawnmower Blenny (Salarias fasciatus): Will sometimes not accept prepared foods and will starve to death in tanks without a natural algae food source

    Diamond, Golden Head, Sleeper Gobies (Valenciennea spp.): Sometimes starve to death even when accepting prepared foods, tanks with large sandbeds containing lots of food will help as will frequent feedings when they will eat, mated pairs may help as well

    Courtjester/Rainford's and Hector's Goby (Amblygobius spp.): Often will not accept prepared foods, need established tanks with a fine sandbed full of life

    Fourline Cleaner Wrasse (Larabicus quadrilineatus): A cleaner when small, but are coralivores as they enter adulthood so are not good reef aquarium inhabitants, some of the Tubelip Wrasses are know for a similar behavior and rarely live long in captivity

    Cephalopods, Octopi, Cuttlefish, Squid (Class Cephalopoda): Not fish, but including them here because of their intelligence compared to the dumb lumps of goo that are most invertebrates, the Nautilus from above is in this group as well, these must have species tanks and require a lot of research before attempting them

    Fish That Require Huge Aquariums (200 gallons or more):

    Cartilaginous Fishes (Sharks, Rays, Skates): Require tanks much larger than 200 gal. and should just be left out of home aquaria, Nurse sharks can grow to 14ft. long!, repeating this one so it sinks in

    Groupers & Seabass (various genera): Especially take note of the cute little Panther Groupers commonly offered in the trade as they can attain over 2' in length

    Snappers (Family Lutjanidae): Those little Red Emperor Snappers seen in the trade get over 3' long

    Unicorn Tangs (Naso spp.): They will even outgrow common size aquariums such as 125 gal. and 180 gal.

    Moray Eels (Family Muraenidae): Do your research as many are not suitable for home aquariums

    Squirrel and Soldierfish (Family Holocentridae): Some of these are borderline, do your research

    Batfish and Spadefish (Family Ephippidae): Probably best left to public aquaria

    Twinspot Wrasse (Coris aygula): Take special note of this one as they're often offered as small attractive juveniles, they get very large and very mean, up to 4' long

    Red Coris Wrasse (Coris gaimard & Coris frerei): Sold as tiny juvenilles they can grow up to be 2' beasts, beware the size of most Coris wrasses, though the common Yellow Coris Wrasse is actually a smaller fish from not in the genus Coris but belonging to the genus Halichoeres

    Dragon Wrasse (Novaculichthys taeniourus): Offered as very small juvenilles they grow to be about a foot long and are known to flip aquarium decorations and rocks when adults

    Flounder (Paralichthys spp.): Rarely suitable for aquarium life, also becoming increasingly rare due to overfishing as a food fish

    Tassled filefish (Chaetoderma pencilligera): Often offered when cute and tiny but grow quite large

    Angelfish (various genera): When purchasing any angelfish that isn't Centropyge be sure to check their ultimate size, take special note of the French, Gray, Blue, and Queen which are often offered as small juvenilles ang will outgrow most aquariums

    Triggerfish (various genera): Most will be fine in large aquariums of around 100 gallons, but there are a few that would be unsuitable for all but the largest home aquariums, do research on their ultimate size and temprament before a purchase is made

    Venomous and/or Toxic Species:

    Stonefishes (Synanceia spp.): Believed to be the most venomous fish in the world

    Scorpionfishes/Rockfishes (various genera): Rhinopias has gained in popularity recently

    Toadfish (family Batrachoididae)

    Lionfish (various genera)

    Rabbitfishes/Foxfaces (Siganus and a sub-genus Lo)

    Coral Catfish (Plotosus lineatus): These also get up to a foot long and become more solitary as they grow

    Blue Ring Octopus (Hapalochlaena spp.)

    Fang Blennies (Meiacanthus spp.): Venomous bites that can be painful

    Flower Urchins (Toxopneustes pileolus): Rare in the trade, but outside the trade there are reported deaths from this species

    Black Longspined Sea Urchins (Diadema spp.): Can inflict painful wounds, some debate exists whether or not they are really venomous, but it's wise to handle all urchins with care

    Cone Shells (Conus spp.): Rarely encountered in the aquarium trade, can be deadly

    Stingrays (familly Dasyatidae): Many have venom associated with the spike on the tail which they use in self defense, fatalities are very rare

    Sea Snakes (various genera I know you're not going to try to add one to your reef aquarium, but included for good measure

    Box Jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri): Quite deadly but of no concern to aquarists

    Hell's Fire Anemone (family Actinodendronidae): While all anemones are capable of stinging, this is the one of the few to be concerned about, very painful stings

    Hydroids: usually just cause skin irritation if anything

    Fire Coral (Millepora spp.): See hydroids

    Sea Mat, Button Polyps, Zoanthids (family Zoanthidae): Some of these can contain Palytoxin which can be quite dangerous, they're quite frequently harmless but if you want to err on the side of caution rubber gloves are a good idea when handling them, as are goggles when fragging them

    Extremely Aggressive Species:

    Undulated Triggerfish (Balistapus undulatus): Perhaps the meanest aquarium fish available and one to avoid unless you don't mind having a large aquarium with one fish

    Queen Triggerfish (Balistes vetula): Not quite as bad as the Undulated, but pretty close and what they lack by comparison in aggression they more than make up for in size

    Clown Triggerfish (Balistoides conspicillum): Pretty similar in demeanor to the above two

    Blueline Triggerfish (Pseudobalistes fuscus): Not so bad when young, but a beast once it grows, probably the least aggressive of the four triggers mentioned

    Passer Angelfish (Holacanthus passer): Probably the meanest of all Angelfish, some of the larger Angels may look like delicate beauties, but some can be quite aggressive

    Damselfish (family Pomacentridae): They're not all bad, but ounce for ounce some of them are the meanest fish around, think long and hard about adding them as some of your first specimens

    Maroon Clownfish (Premnas biaculeatus): Females get quite large and they can take over medium size tanks, they're also probably the least tolerant of other clown species

    Sohal Tang (Acanthurus sohal): Much hardier than the Clown Tang but just about as mean, probably best to keep them as the lone Tang, and if you must keep one in a community reef tank make it your last fish addition

    Bicolor Pseudochromis (Pseudochromis paccagnellae) A lot of Pseudochromis get a bad wrap, but this isn't one of those cases, very nasty fish, P. porphyreus, P. diadema, and P. aldabraensis are others to be weary of


    Set up date: August 2009 Display Size: 110 gallons Total Water In System: 140 gallons Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? NO Amount of Liverock: 100 mix Depth of Sandbed: 1 Salinity level: 1.025
    ALK level: 8.5 Ammonia: 0.001 Nitrate: 0.001 Nitrite: 0.001
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: 400
    ATI Sunpower - 6 Bulb Skimz SM251 skimmer NO
    Fish and Inverts: Clown Fish ● Wrasse ● Hawkfish ● Tang ● Cardinal ● Anthias ● Urchin ● Shrimp ● Snails Corals: Lots of SPS & some Zoa's.
      Other Information: Parameter updated Oct. 7th, 2013
    Hardware
    Display Tank Size: Miracle Aquarium peninsula 110 gallons
    Sump: 40 gallons
    Filtration: Skimz SM251 skimmer Phosphate Reactor X 2 running GAC GFO
    Additives: BRS 2 part, dosing system 300 ml daily
    Other equipment: DA Reef Keeper Lite wtih ORP PH Temp monitor American Pinpoint PH Temp Monitor
    Biological Filtration
    Live Rock/Sand: <100lb Mix L/R Sugar Size Sand 90lb
    Lighting
    Lighting: DT ATI Sunpower w/6 Bulb Reef Brite & Reef Brite XHO Custom Made Moon Light Sump DIY LED
    Water
    Water: RO/DI unit, 6 stage Aqua-safe with dual membrane Kent Marine Reef Salt
    Amount of flow: Return Pump (Poseidon PS4) Powerhead (Koralia Evo 1400 X 4 on Wavemaker) Tunze 6045 modified X 2
    Live Stock
    Fish: Leopard WrasseYellow Coris WrasseLong Nose Hawkfish Ocellaris Clown Tang Anthias Cardinal
    Inverts: Tuxedo Urchin Fire Shrimp Astrea Turbo Nassarius Snails
    Corals: Lots of SPS Some Zoa's




  6. #6
    shureef's Avatar
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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies

    Thanks for all you Pros' suggestions. I wish I can have this "first hand" information a lot earlier. In spite of lots of readings and research often you get mixed information and the LFS often says things you want to hear. Lots fishes, money and frustration would be saved. I will still try to hang on to this hobby. thanks all.

    shureef

    Set up date: January 2012 Display Size: 200 Total Water In System: 230 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? YES Amount of Liverock: 200 Depth of Sandbed: 4 Salinity level: 1.025
    ALK level: don't know Ammonia: don't know Nitrate: don't know Nitrite: don't know
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: don't know
    nova T5 HOX4 bm nac7 NO
    Fish and Inverts: flame angel, 3xdamsel, bi-color blenny, 2xclown, yellow tang, bi-color dottyback, gold head goby, swallowtail angel(girl), banded shrimp, cleaner shrimp, snails, Corals: softies & Lps
    Other Equipment: RO/DI 4 STAGE

  7. #7
    Atomikk is offline Reefing Fanatic

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    ........except mine.
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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies


    Set up date: December 2004 Display Size: 180+320+72=572 Total Water In System: 772 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? YES Amount of Liverock: 400 lbs of Fiji Ultra Grade Depth of Sandbed: 4" Salinity level: 1.025
    ALK level: 9 dkH Ammonia: 0 Nitrate: 0 Nitrite: 0
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: 440 ppm
    2x PFO Dual Ballast, 4x 250w XM 10K Euro Reef RS180 Yes, DIY Geo Dual Chamber, 20lb CO2 canister
    Fish and Inverts: 1x Green Chromis (Chromis atripectoralis), Clarki Clown (Amphiprion clarkii), Splendid Dottyback (Pseudochromis splendens), Full Moon Reef Goby (Priolepis nocturna), Sohal Tang (Acanthurus sohal), Pink Tail Trigger (Melichthys niger), Copperband Butterfly (Chelmon rostratus) Corals: Everything that you can imagine. If you want a list, order my book.
    Other Equipment: 2x Reeflo Wahoo pumps, 1x mag 7 Pumps, 2x MJ 1200, 1x 820 SEIO, 1x 1100 SEIO, Tunze Osmolator Topoff, 100gpd Aqua Safe RO/DI, 9w Turbo Twist UV, PhosBan Rector, 1x WavySea.

  8. #8
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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies

    yep, i have to agree! I was told to start with he damsels as well and they are aggressive, the peck at my hand when i try to arrange the rock work and they chase guys that are twice their size! On the other hand some say that the 6 line wrasse are aggressive, but both of mine were shy, the first one jumped died!.

    Set up date: August 2007 Display Size: 150g Total Water In System: 215 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? YES Amount of Liverock: 80 lb Indo & 80 lb Fiji Depth of Sandbed: 3" Salinity level: .025
    ALK level: 10-11 Ammonia: 0 Nitrate: 0.02 Nitrite: 0.01
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: 380-400
    Vertex illumina LED 36" Vertex Alpha 250 no currently dosing 2 part with Magnisium
    Fish and Inverts: cleaner shrimp, trochus snails, turbo snails, fighting conch, Salifin tang, powder blue tang, yellow wrass, orange wrass, 10 x blue chromis, 5 Antias. Corals: head green/pink frog spawn, 1x hammer coral, Super man frag, blue tort accorpora, Ricordia, Gorgonians. Green tort acro.
    Other Equipment: Rowa pho reactor, 2 Tunze 6100 with multi controller 7095, Buckeye RO/DI, Sedra 12000 return pump, auto top off with kalk, UV unit

  9. #9
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    battleshark007 is offline 007

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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies

    Sweet ride...... hands down man...

    Those are great lists of species... and I had maybe half of those before!!

    I would second some of the fishes or invertebrates that I kept and didn't make it....

    1. Moorish Idol - hard to feed with the little mouth. I tried to use garlic and seachem Entice to soak my frozen food... didn't work. Way too picky

    2. Clown Tang - Hard to feed and easy to get sick. I got mine to live for a few months without eating.

    3. Regal Angel - didn't eat.

    4. Sea Goblin - very cool fish! Looks like puffer mixed with mandarin goby. Didn't eat and died the very next day!

    5. Skates - Doesn't eat and sensitive to water changes

    6. Harlequin shrimp - only eat starfish. I remembered one time I have to get starfish to feed the shrimp in the middle of a snowstorm.

    That's all I can remember now....

    RIP to those fish brothers and sisters...

    Set up date: May 2004 Display Size: 125 Total Water In System: 165 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? YES Amount of Liverock: 120 lbs Depth of Sandbed: 3 Salinity level: 1.026
    ALK level: 11 Ammonia: 0 Nitrate: 0 Nitrite: 0
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: 450
    Coralife Aqualight Pro (3 MHs, 4 Blue PCs, 3 LED Moon lights) Red Sea Berlin Turbo XL Skimmer no
    Fish and Inverts: Sailfin Tang, Unicorn Tang, Marine Betta, Diana Hogfish, Nigger Trigger, Fairy Wrasse, Foxface, Banded Moray Eel, Pink Square Anthias, 20 snails, 5 Hermit Crabs, 100 baby starfishes, 3 conches, blue tuxedo urchin Corals: Purple Polyps, Hairy Mushroom, Brown buttons polyps, SPS, open brain coral, Torch, Galaxia
     

  10. #10
    shureef's Avatar
    shureef is offline Registered User

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    Re: fishes to avoid for newbies

    thanks for sharing the "first hand" experience. i got my fair share too.
    After all, it's hard to resist not to buy them when u see them in the fish store, those beautiful fishes mentioned above are the reason why lots of us get into this hobby.
    they are just not that easy.

    Set up date: January 2012 Display Size: 200 Total Water In System: 230 Do you have a sump? YES
    Do you have a refugium? YES Amount of Liverock: 200 Depth of Sandbed: 4 Salinity level: 1.025
    ALK level: don't know Ammonia: don't know Nitrate: don't know Nitrite: don't know
    What lighting are you using? What skimmer are you using? Calcium Reactor? Calcium level: don't know
    nova T5 HOX4 bm nac7 NO
    Fish and Inverts: flame angel, 3xdamsel, bi-color blenny, 2xclown, yellow tang, bi-color dottyback, gold head goby, swallowtail angel(girl), banded shrimp, cleaner shrimp, snails, Corals: softies & Lps
    Other Equipment: RO/DI 4 STAGE

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